Author's Posts

  • Sustainable Web Design

    Sustainable Web Design0

    As the scientists published a warning that the environmental health is getting worse and worse, consumers are getting more aware in the effort of protecting the environment. More businesses today are adopting environmentally friendly strategies into their marketing strategies. Not only in marketing but also in every possible aspects in running their companies. It has great impact, not only to the environment but also to their reputation with the consumers. Consumers have more positive reaction to a company when the company supports sustainable practices.

    This might sound funny but a website can be a place to do energy savings. According to a Greenpeace study, if internet were a country, it would rank sixth for the largest energy usage in the world! Serving web pages are requiring computers to run 24 hours, that amount of power requires enormous size of energy. The best way to cope with this is to choose a green web hosting companies that are purchasing carbon offsets to make up for the energy that they used, or some others use renewable energy sources such as wind and solar to power their servers. Web Design Malaysia highly recommends this to people who want to build website.

    Aside from the hosting, web design also helps. The lighter the pages, the faster the loading speed, the lesser the energy use. Try to audit your site and remove excessive images and videos, try to optimize them so that the loading speed would get faster and use less amount of energy.

    In the effort of creating a healthy environment, small actions matter. From changing the material of your products, adding some plants in your office balcony, reuse and recycling your product waste, to even redesigning your website for lesser energy use. Web Design Malaysia encourages all business owner to focus on going green, in every possible ways.

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  • Greece's reform plan backed by creditors

    Greece's reform plan backed by creditors2

    Britons are normally never more comfortable than when talking about the weather, but recent extreme weather events have began to test that theory. Since December, the United Kingdom has faced a relentless assault from some of the worst winter weather on record. It began with the worst storm and tidal surges in 60 years hitting the North Sea coastline, floods that ruined Christmas for thousands across Surrey and Dorset and in January, the most exceptional period of rainfall since 1766. The deluge has transformed swathes of southern England into cold, dark lakes, destroying homes and businesses.

    Politicians have looked weak in the face of such natural disaster, with many facing criticism from local residents for doing little more than turning up as “flood tourists” at the site of disasters, incapable of helping those in crisis and only there for a photo opportunity. The Environment Agency, the body responsible for combating floods and managing rivers, has also been blamed for failing to curb the disasters. But there’s an ever larger debate over the role of climate change in the current floods and storms, and it has been unremittingly hostile.

    Politicians have looked weak in the face of such natural disaster, with many facing criticism from local residents.— Julia Slingo, ETF

    For those affected by flooding however, their immediate concerns are not necessarily about the manmade changes to the earth’s atmosphere. A YouGov poll from February found that while 84% of those surveyed believed Britain was likely to experience similar extreme weather events in the next few years, only 30% thought it was connected to man-made climate change. Politicians have looked weak in the face of such disaster.

    There is no evidence to counter the basic premise that a warmer world will lead to more intense daily and hourly rain events. When heavy rain in 2000 devastated parts of Britain, a later study found the climate change had doubled the chances of the flood occurring, said Julia Slingo.…

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  • Highlights: New York Fashion Week 2015

    Highlights: New York Fashion Week 20152

    Britons are normally never more comfortable than when talking about the weather, but recent extreme weather events have began to test that theory. Since December, the United Kingdom has faced a relentless assault from some of the worst winter weather on record. It began with the worst storm and tidal surges in 60 years hitting the North Sea coastline, floods that ruined Christmas for thousands across Surrey and Dorset and in January, the most exceptional period of rainfall since 1766. The deluge has transformed swathes of southern England into cold, dark lakes, destroying homes and businesses.

    Politicians have looked weak in the face of such natural disaster, with many facing criticism from local residents for doing little more than turning up as “flood tourists” at the site of disasters, incapable of helping those in crisis and only there for a photo opportunity. The Environment Agency, the body responsible for combating floods and managing rivers, has also been blamed for failing to curb the disasters. But there’s an ever larger debate over the role of climate change in the current floods and storms, and it has been unremittingly hostile.

    Politicians have looked weak in the face of such natural disaster, with many facing criticism from local residents.— Julia Slingo, ETF

    For those affected by flooding however, their immediate concerns are not necessarily about the manmade changes to the earth’s atmosphere. A YouGov poll from February found that while 84% of those surveyed believed Britain was likely to experience similar extreme weather events in the next few years, only 30% thought it was connected to man-made climate change. Politicians have looked weak in the face of such disaster.

    There is no evidence to counter the basic premise that a warmer world will lead to more intense daily and hourly rain events. When heavy rain in 2000 devastated parts of Britain, a later study found the climate change had doubled the chances of the flood occurring, said Julia Slingo.…

    READ MORE
  • Nuclear fusion closer to becoming a reality

    Nuclear fusion closer to becoming a reality4

    Britons are normally never more comfortable than when talking about the weather, but recent extreme weather events have began to test that theory. Since December, the United Kingdom has faced a relentless assault from some of the worst winter weather on record. It began with the worst storm and tidal surges in 60 years hitting the North Sea coastline, floods that ruined Christmas for thousands across Surrey and Dorset and in January, the most exceptional period of rainfall since 1766. The deluge has transformed swathes of southern England into cold, dark lakes, destroying homes and businesses.

    Politicians have looked weak in the face of such natural disaster, with many facing criticism from local residents for doing little more than turning up as “flood tourists” at the site of disasters, incapable of helping those in crisis and only there for a photo opportunity. The Environment Agency, the body responsible for combating floods and managing rivers, has also been blamed for failing to curb the disasters. But there’s an ever larger debate over the role of climate change in the current floods and storms, and it has been unremittingly hostile.

    Politicians have looked weak in the face of such natural disaster, with many facing criticism from local residents.— Julia Slingo, ETF

    For those affected by flooding however, their immediate concerns are not necessarily about the manmade changes to the earth’s atmosphere. A YouGov poll from February found that while 84% of those surveyed believed Britain was likely to experience similar extreme weather events in the next few years, only 30% thought it was connected to man-made climate change. Politicians have looked weak in the face of such disaster.

    There is no evidence to counter the basic premise that a warmer world will lead to more intense daily and hourly rain events. When heavy rain in 2000 devastated parts of Britain, a later study found the climate change had doubled the chances of the flood occurring, said Julia Slingo.…

    READ MORE